Slavery and Slave Prostitution in the Modern World

If in the beginning of 21st century a war in the Western hemisphere had erupted, leaving in the battlefields half a million soldiers dead in a single year, it would have been recorded in military text books as one of the greatest in the history of humanity. Add to these casualties twelve million prisoners of war in the same year, and you will get a scale of hostility surpassing that of WWII. What would happen if such a war continued for10 years with the same result every year?

It is obvious that the Western world won’t be able to sustain such loss of life and stress on its economy for long. What would happen though, if there is a criminal activity, which results in the same magnitude of tragedy, but for aliens, whose life is none of our business? Could this happen in our time? If so, would we care less if their misery contributes to our prosperity and pleasures of life?

Don’t rush to say ‘no’, since this is the scale of human suffering resulting from the modern slavery in all its variety. As in all ages in the past, insatiable appetite for money is the driving force behind the human trafficking – now the third largest criminal activity in the contemporary world, after arms trade and narcotics.

In 2010, the U.S. Department of State celebrated the 10th anniversary of Trafficking in Persons Report, in which it outlined the status of progress in fighting international human trafficking and slavery. Astonishing are not only numbers representing illegal activity. Not to the lesser degree impressive is the fact that the report, reflecting the attention of international community to this problem, is only 10 years old, whereas the slavery flourished in all twentieth century. As a matter of fact, slavery has always been a part of humanity, but the topic of this article is the slavery of modern times, when prosperity and respect for human rights reached, it seems, the highest point in history.

As the report states, … people are in situations of modern slavery in most countries; trafficking is a fluid phenomenon responding to market demands, weakness in laws and penalties, and economic and development disparities.

Statistics speak louder than words. According to the report, adults, child-forced labour, and prostitution trafficking around the globe is about 12,300,000 (12.3 mln.) annually. Since the U.S. Department report had started, 120 million people were smuggled as slaves for prostitution and labour force.

Successful trafficking persecution is 4,166. Yes, you have read it right: approximately four thousand criminal punishments a year for more than twelve million ruined human lives.

Inevitably, a question should come to everyone’s mind: why one of the largest – and oldest – criminal activities in the world goes on virtually unpunished? How come both police and immigration authorities of the countries around the world fail to notice so many people brought inside their countries and exploited, often in the most despicable way?

One of the reasons is the unusual cooperation of victims with international criminal syndicates, which bring them legally and illegally to the country of their illegal employment. For good measure, employers seeking cheap labour – since competition on the market is brutal out there – cooperate with criminals or participate in criminal activity. And that is not all. The victims of human trafficking, in fact, trespass the laws of the country where they happen to work, by the very fact of their illegal stay and employment. If they complain, they face deportation, or severe punishment or death from the gangs which provided them this employment. As we mentioned before, very few mobsters get punished by the law, and this is usually a very mild punishment.

Interesting is not only the statistics, provided in the U.S. Government report, but the absence of it regarding some aspects of the subject matter. There is no mention of legal persecution of employers who use cheap labour of illegal slaves. This is a peculiar situation: only those who use slaves are not legally responsible. If legislation punishing employers were in place, we would probably see a significant reduction of human trafficking and associated problems.

There are numerous other issues with the trafficked slaves, which no government is able to resolve. Deportation is the natural option, but if deported, the victim faces harassment of criminal bands that traffic him or her, re-trafficking to the same or another country, or death. Keeping trafficked persons, millions of new ones every year, in jail or shelter, is not an option either: no country is rich enough to stretch its resources that far at the expense of its own population. Grant immigration status? This will cause even more serious problems, such as overburdening the health care system, high unemployment rate, crime, you name it. The world of poor countries is too big to accommodate their population inside the more prosperous ones.

Understanding this, theU.S.government drafted a vague road map to tackle the problem.

“It is not enough to prosecute traffickers if we do not also provide assistance to the survivors and work to ensure that no one else is victimized. No country has yet attained a truly comprehensive response to this massive, ever-increasing crime.”

And then, there is an indirect admission that this is a mission impossible. “Ten years of focused efforts is the mere infancy of this modern movement; many countries are still learning about human trafficking and the best responses to it.”

There are some voices that are quick to blame their governments for inactivity or neglect to human tragedy of that scale. However, it is unlikely that the international community will achieve a better success in fighting human trafficking in the future. The slave trade is a reflection of incurable disease of affluent societies, stemming from disparity of the poor and the rich.

To better understand this cruel truism of the modern time, suffice it to make a quick overview of the situation beyond the borders of the developed world. There are more than 1 billion people living in appalling poverty. These people starve, as they have no money to buy food. They can not afford to buy clothes. Their living conditions are not much better than they were a millennium ago. They have no medical help, social assistance, or anything else, which can ease their suffering. For many, the slavery and humiliation they are subject to in the Western world, is not a bad solution. If they can spare a few bucks in a month and send them back to their families, they consider it as a huge bonus, which helps their relatives to survive.

Hundreds of millions of workers inChinalive below the poverty line. Their exploitation is brutal, often worse than that of the trafficked slaves. Many of them would prefer the slavery in the West to exploitation in their country. Add to them the uncountable millions of other misfortunate, trapped in genocide wars, civil unrest, massive prolonged unemployment, and similar conditions, and you will get a good idea about the pressure on the borders of the developed world countries. Can rich help all the poor? If they can, how much time it will take? Has it ever happened in the past?

One of the cruellest aspects of human trafficking is slave prostitution. According to the State Report, its ratio to the overall slave trade is approximately 9:1. This is what is says: “Recent studies show the majority of human trafficking in the world takes the form of forced labour. The ILO estimates that for every trafficking victim subjected to forced prostitution, nine people are forced to work.” This means that roughly 1.4 million of slave prostitutes, mostly women, are smuggled yearly in the global commercial sex trade.

According to the report, “Sex trafficking has devastating consequences for minors, including long-lasting physical and psychological trauma, disease (including HIV/AIDS), drug addiction, unwanted pregnancy, malnutrition, social ostracism, and possible death.”

A significant part of slave prostitutes, if not the majority, does not last long. Severe, merciless exploitation, lack of health care, and elementary living conditions make their lives extremely short. Thus, according to some expert’s estimates, a slave prostitute lasts approximately four years. After this period she/he either dies from diseases, or becomes unusable for the intended service. That is why every year new prostitutes, in the same or increasing numbers, are needed for the world’s prosperous economies where human ills flourish as poisonous weeds on the fertile soil.

This is a proof of the truism that the fastest and easiest money is made on misfortunes. In despair, people pay the predators by money, their body parts, labour, and life. Suffering and a short life for the pleasure of others is their destiny. Misery and despair drives them to slavery, and there is no end to that problem in sight. As Ian Morris put it in his book Why the West Rules – for Now: “The population movement could dwarf anything in history.” We already see a striking demographic change in every country in the Western world. Human trafficking is just an illegal part of it.

Human trafficking for prostitution, however, is not only a humanitarian issue. It results in a significant increase in criminal activity, such as document forgery, corruption, narcotics supply, arms trade, early death from physical abuse and brutal exploitation, and facilitates spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

Criminal gangs involved in the business of human trafficking have their problems, too. In peaceful times, crossing borders is not trivial, particularly so when a large and constant stream of people must be handled. Their job gets easier at the time of war, when anarchy rules. This was particularly evident in Europe, in the war-tornYugoslaviaduring the 1990s. At the time of genocide and mass graves, everyone cared first and foremost about his or her own life, human trafficking and slavery being the last thing to think about.

This war coincided with collapse of theSoviet Unionand with it, the collapse of the economy of the whole Eastern Bloc. This was a unique situation: supply of slave labour, and young girls for slave prostitution, became virtually unlimited. The Balkans, with its convenient geography for trafficking to the whole world, was in anarchy of civil war; criminal gangs had a free hand to do whatever they wanted. All conditions were in place for the massive migration of white people to slavery. International criminal gangs, spearheaded by the Russian mafia, did not miss this unique opportunity.

Fifteen years passed since the war inYugoslaviaended. Trafficking through the Balkans has diminished considerably, but still remains strong.

According to contemporary Belgrade statistics, “More than 120,000 women and children, victims of human trafficking, pass through the Balkan region per year before heading to EU member countries,” the Serbian government reports.

Many sources estimate that one prostitute in a Western country brings $50,000 to $100,000 per year to the pimp. Is it possible to shut down such a market? Money speaks.

Demographics of prostitutes in Western Europehave changed in the 21st century. As Russian statistics indicate, European women are from 15 to 25 years old, single, many of them with University education. This is probably an indication that exploitation of prostitutes became less cruel, that most women know their destination, and poverty and despair drives them into the hands of criminal gangs.

In the novel, Payback for Revenge, I told the story of innocent young girls, trafficked throughYugoslavia to their final gruesome destination: slave prostitution and early death. A female American journalist reports her eyewitness account on horrors of the Balkan war in the early 1990s, forced prostitution, and human trafficking, at the background of her personal drama and passionate love affair. I believe that the world would be better if everyone knows about the destiny of the silent victims of illegal slave trade around us, and the silence of complicity around them.

 

 

Slavery and Slave Prostitution in the Modern World

If in the beginning of 21st century a war in the Western hemisphere had erupted, leaving in the battlefields half a million soldiers dead in a single year, it would have been recorded in military text books as one of the greatest in the history of humanity. Add to these casualties twelve million prisoners of war in the same year, and you will get a scale of hostility surpassing that of WWII. What would happen if such a war continued for10 years with the same result every year?

It is obvious that the Western world won’t be able to sustain such loss of life and stress on its economy for long. What would happen though, if there is a criminal activity, which results in the same magnitude of tragedy, but for aliens, whose life is none of our business? Could this happen in our time? If so, would we care less if their misery contributes to our prosperity and pleasures of life?

Don’t rush to say ‘no’, since this is the scale of human suffering resulting from the modern slavery in all its variety. As in all ages in the past, insatiable appetite for money is the driving force behind the human trafficking – now the third largest criminal activity in the contemporary world, after arms trade and narcotics.

In 2010, the U.S. Department of State celebrated the 10th anniversary of Trafficking in Persons Report, in which it outlined the status of progress in fighting international human trafficking and slavery. Astonishing are not only numbers representing illegal activity. Not to the lesser degree impressive is the fact that the report, reflecting the attention of international community to this problem, is only 10 years old, whereas the slavery flourished in all twentieth century. As a matter of fact, slavery has always been a part of humanity, but the topic of this article is the slavery of modern times, when prosperity and respect for human rights reached, it seems, the highest point in history.

As the report states, … people are in situations of modern slavery in most countries; trafficking is a fluid phenomenon responding to market demands, weakness in laws and penalties, and economic and development disparities.

Statistics speak louder than words. According to the report, adults, child-forced labour, and prostitution trafficking around the globe is about 12,300,000 (12.3 mln.) annually. Since the U.S. Department report had started, 120 million people were smuggled as slaves for prostitution and labour force.

Successful trafficking persecution is 4,166. Yes, you have read it right: approximately four thousand criminal punishments a year for more than twelve million ruined human lives.

Inevitably, a question should come to everyone’s mind: why one of the largest – and oldest – criminal activities in the world goes on virtually unpunished? How come both police and immigration authorities of the countries around the world fail to notice so many people brought inside their countries and exploited, often in the most despicable way?

One of the reasons is the unusual cooperation of victims with international criminal syndicates, which bring them legally and illegally to the country of their illegal employment. For good measure, employers seeking cheap labour – since competition on the market is brutal out there – cooperate with criminals or participate in criminal activity. And that is not all. The victims of human trafficking, in fact, trespass the laws of the country where they happen to work, by the very fact of their illegal stay and employment. If they complain, they face deportation, or severe punishment or death from the gangs which provided them this employment. As we mentioned before, very few mobsters get punished by the law, and this is usually a very mild punishment.

Interesting is not only the statistics, provided in the U.S. Government report, but the absence of it regarding some aspects of the subject matter. There is no mention of legal persecution of employers who use cheap labour of illegal slaves. This is a peculiar situation: only those who use slaves are not legally responsible. If legislation punishing employers were in place, we would probably see a significant reduction of human trafficking and associated problems.

There are numerous other issues with the trafficked slaves, which no government is able to resolve. Deportation is the natural option, but if deported, the victim faces harassment of criminal bands that traffic him or her, re-trafficking to the same or another country, or death. Keeping trafficked persons, millions of new ones every year, in jail or shelter, is not an option either: no country is rich enough to stretch its resources that far at the expense of its own population. Grant immigration status? This will cause even more serious problems, such as overburdening the health care system, high unemployment rate, crime, you name it. The world of poor countries is too big to accommodate their population inside the more prosperous ones.

Understanding this, theU.S.government drafted a vague road map to tackle the problem.

“It is not enough to prosecute traffickers if we do not also provide assistance to the survivors and work to ensure that no one else is victimized. No country has yet attained a truly comprehensive response to this massive, ever-increasing crime.”

And then, there is an indirect admission that this is a mission impossible. “Ten years of focused efforts is the mere infancy of this modern movement; many countries are still learning about human trafficking and the best responses to it.”

There are some voices that are quick to blame their governments for inactivity or neglect to human tragedy of that scale. However, it is unlikely that the international community will achieve a better success in fighting human trafficking in the future. The slave trade is a reflection of incurable disease of affluent societies, stemming from disparity of the poor and the rich.

To better understand this cruel truism of the modern time, suffice it to make a quick overview of the situation beyond the borders of the developed world. There are more than 1 billion people living in appalling poverty. These people starve, as they have no money to buy food. They can not afford to buy clothes. Their living conditions are not much better than they were a millennium ago. They have no medical help, social assistance, or anything else, which can ease their suffering. For many, the slavery and humiliation they are subject to in the Western world, is not a bad solution. If they can spare a few bucks in a month and send them back to their families, they consider it as a huge bonus, which helps their relatives to survive.

Hundreds of millions of workers inChinalive below the poverty line. Their exploitation is brutal, often worse than that of the trafficked slaves. Many of them would prefer the slavery in the West to exploitation in their country. Add to them the uncountable millions of other misfortunate, trapped in genocide wars, civil unrest, massive prolonged unemployment, and similar conditions, and you will get a good idea about the pressure on the borders of the developed world countries. Can rich help all the poor? If they can, how much time it will take? Has it ever happened in the past?

One of the cruellest aspects of human trafficking is slave prostitution. According to the State Report, its ratio to the overall slave trade is approximately 9:1. This is what is says: “Recent studies show the majority of human trafficking in the world takes the form of forced labour. The ILO estimates that for every trafficking victim subjected to forced prostitution, nine people are forced to work.” This means that roughly 1.4 million of slave prostitutes, mostly women, are smuggled yearly in the global commercial sex trade.

According to the report, “Sex trafficking has devastating consequences for minors, including long-lasting physical and psychological trauma, disease (including HIV/AIDS), drug addiction, unwanted pregnancy, malnutrition, social ostracism, and possible death.”

A significant part of slave prostitutes, if not the majority, does not last long. Severe, merciless exploitation, lack of health care, and elementary living conditions make their lives extremely short. Thus, according to some expert’s estimates, a slave prostitute lasts approximately four years. After this period she/he either dies from diseases, or becomes unusable for the intended service. That is why every year new prostitutes, in the same or increasing numbers, are needed for the world’s prosperous economies where human ills flourish as poisonous weeds on the fertile soil.

This is a proof of the truism that the fastest and easiest money is made on misfortunes. In despair, people pay the predators by money, their body parts, labour, and life. Suffering and a short life for the pleasure of others is their destiny. Misery and despair drives them to slavery, and there is no end to that problem in sight. As Ian Morris put it in his book Why the West Rules – for Now: “The population movement could dwarf anything in history.” We already see a striking demographic change in every country in the Western world. Human trafficking is just an illegal part of it.

Human trafficking for prostitution, however, is not only a humanitarian issue. It results in a significant increase in criminal activity, such as document forgery, corruption, narcotics supply, arms trade, early death from physical abuse and brutal exploitation, and facilitates spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

Criminal gangs involved in the business of human trafficking have their problems, too. In peaceful times, crossing borders is not trivial, particularly so when a large and constant stream of people must be handled. Their job gets easier at the time of war, when anarchy rules. This was particularly evident in Europe, in the war-tornYugoslaviaduring the 1990s. At the time of genocide and mass graves, everyone cared first and foremost about his or her own life, human trafficking and slavery being the last thing to think about.

This war coincided with collapse of theSoviet Unionand with it, the collapse of the economy of the whole Eastern Bloc. This was a unique situation: supply of slave labour, and young girls for slave prostitution, became virtually unlimited. The Balkans, with its convenient geography for trafficking to the whole world, was in anarchy of civil war; criminal gangs had a free hand to do whatever they wanted. All conditions were in place for the massive migration of white people to slavery. International criminal gangs, spearheaded by the Russian mafia, did not miss this unique opportunity.

Fifteen years passed since the war inYugoslaviaended. Trafficking through the Balkans has diminished considerably, but still remains strong.

According to contemporary Belgrade statistics, “More than 120,000 women and children, victims of human trafficking, pass through the Balkan region per year before heading to EU member countries,” the Serbian government reports.

Many sources estimate that one prostitute in a Western country brings $50,000 to $100,000 per year to the pimp. Is it possible to shut down such a market? Money speaks.

Demographics of prostitutes in Western Europehave changed in the 21st century. As Russian statistics indicate, European women are from 15 to 25 years old, single, many of them with University education. This is probably an indication that exploitation of prostitutes became less cruel, that most women know their destination, and poverty and despair drives them into the hands of criminal gangs.

I believe that the world would be better if everyone knows about the destiny of the silent victims of illegal slave trade around us, and the silence of complicity around them.

 http://sites.google.com/site/alexmarkmanwriter/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Payback-Revenge-Alex-Markman/dp/0981163769/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1268514001&sr=1-2

 

 

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